At the Garden: June 11, 2016

Volunteers: from Redeemer, Grace Chapel, Hancock, St. Nicholas, First Parish, First Baptist and Lexington High School

Weather: cool and dry
Harvest: Lettuce, mint, tarragon, oregano, Bok choy, dill, broccoli rab, rhubarb and arugula

Tasks: Harvesting, weeding, planting carrots and beets in small garden, planting bok choy in seedling trays and LOTS of mulching.

Isn’t this one good-looking mulched garden? Carla advocates investing the time to mulch early in the growing season in order to avoid a lot of weeding later on, as well as achieving better moisture retention. This picture is the “after” picture...all accomplished on Saturday.

Isn’t this one good-looking mulched garden? Carla advocates investing the time to mulch early in the growing season in order to avoid a lot of weeding later on, as well as achieving better moisture retention. This picture is the “after” picture…all accomplished on Saturday.

Here are the steps we followed to mulch:

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First things first. You have to weed, weed, weed. Best to start with a clean bed before mulching.

Then you prep the bottommost layer–wet newspapers. It’s an inexpensive, commonly found material. Consider it another way to recycle.

papersoakingJanet, Amanda and Pauline are dunking newspaper in buckets of water to thoroughly wet them.

Next, Carla explains to the volunteers that they should put down about 6 layers of wet newsprint. That’s about the size of a typical newspaper section nowadays. laynewspaperBetween good overlapping and making sure the paper is really wet, you should avoid having them all blow away on those blustery days we have been experiencing lately.

Elaine and Amanda then put a top layer of salt marsh hay over the wet newspaper. layinghayAfter we left Carla was going to wet the hay again to make it less vulnerable to being blown away. Carla prefers to use salt marsh hay as the top layer since it doesn’t have seed that would later sprout grass.

 

At the Garden: May 21, 2016

Volunteers from Hancock, First Baptist, Sacred Heart, Chinese Bible Church and the community all pitched in.Weather: sunny and warm

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Almost 33 pounds of fresh produce was picked and delivered this morning. It included bok choy, arugula, lettuce, radishes, herbs, green onions, asparagus, rhubarb and spinach.

 

 

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Here is how the garden looked in May, You can see some beds yet to plant. Seeds and seedlings planted in the beds were peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, carrots, and some flowers.

t took a group effort to harvest the bounty of greens.

It took a group effort to harvest the bounty of greens.

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Elaine and Lisa trimmed the rhubarb.

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potatoes that managed to get overlooked last season suddenly sprouted. Unfortunately, these volunteers were in inopportune locations. Carla had us carefully dig them up, trying not to disturb the surrounding young plants. Do you see the potatoes that Tarla dug up?

ine took a turn at the weighing station.

ine took a turn at the weighing station.

The new bee hives arrived. I think I heard that each hive has a queen and 200 young bees. They have taken up residence in a new spot on the side of the barn. According to Carla, they seem very happy—lots of activity, which is a good sign.

The new bee hives arrived. I think I heard that each hive has a queen and 200 young bees. They have taken up residence in a new spot on the side of the barn. According to Carla, they seem very happy—lots of activity, which is a good sign.

At the Garden: April 23, 2016

Volunteers from First Baptist, Chinese Bible Church, and Hancock helped this morning.

Weather: drizzly

Potatoes were planted here in the gullies of the hill piles above. Each week volunteers will check to see if the potato plants have started to poke through the soil. If yes, they will be buried again with the soil from the hillocks beside them.

Potatoes were planted here in the gullies of the hill piles above. Each week volunteers will check to see if the potato plants have started to poke through the soil. If yes, they will be buried again with the soil from the hillocks beside them.

 

Seed packets are organized in the barn, waiting for their turn to be planted.

Seed packets are organized in the barn, waiting for their turn to be planted.

 

You can see the progression of paths which now are defining more of the beds as they have been established. Poles in the back half are where the peas were planted.

You can see the progression of paths which now are defining more of the beds as they have been established. Poles in the back half are where the peas were planted.

 

Our excellent path builders. First put down wet newspapers and then cover with a layer of straw.

Our excellent path builders. First put down wet newspapers and then cover with a layer of straw.

One of our volunteers shared something new with us—how a weed we would have blithely tossed away is used in other cultures. The feathery green this volunteer is holding can be cooked along with ginger and soy to create a broth that sooths the tummy.

One of our volunteers shared something new with us—how a weed we would have blithely tossed away is used in other cultures. The feathery green this volunteer is holding can be cooked along with ginger and soy to create a broth that sooths the tummy.

At the Garden – April 2, 2016

Volunteers came from the Chinese Bible Church of Greater Boston, Hancock, and Grace Chapel.

Can you see the first stalks of asparagus? It won’t be long before they are harvestable. I wonder how much later we see the evidence of the cool weather crops (peas, greens, etc.) that were planted by Tuesday’s crew.

. . . → Read More: At the Garden – April 2, 2016

Our Seventh Season Begins!

Report from the Interfaith Garden – March 19, 2016

First things first…signing in!

Mark has already looked back at prior years and found that our first day this year fits the pattern of opening within a week of the first day of Spring….excepting last year of course, when we got an almost 3-wk . . . → Read More: Our Seventh Season Begins!

September 19: A Four Cart Day!

Volunteers from Chinese Bible Church, Follen, Redeemer, First Baptist and Hancock

Weather: Nice cool fall day. Damp due to the hour, but soon dissipated.

Harvested today: 220 pounds including broccoli, beans, eggplant, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, Swiss chard, cabbage, pumpkins, bok choy, butternut squash, acorn squash, radishes, scallions, kale, green peppers, arugula, and . . . → Read More: September 19: A Four Cart Day!

At the Garden: Saturday, September 12

Volunteers from Chinese Bible Church, Hancock, Redeemer, First Baptist, Follen, Quakers and the neighborhood.

Weather: Bit damp after rain of past two days, but otherwise fine.

Harvested: a total of 108.5 lbs. including tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers, broccoli, pole beans, eggplant, kale, chard, peaches, green peppers, bok choy, green onions, . . . → Read More: At the Garden: Saturday, September 12

At the Garden: Saturday, August 22

Volunteers: members from Hancock, Follen, Pilgrim, and the Chinese Bible Church

Weather: Hazy and damp, but no rain.

Yield: Informal estimate of 155 pounds consisting of kale, eggplant, rhubarb, potatoes, green peppers, beans, broccoli, yellow squash, cherry tomatoes, zucchini, tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, parsley, basil, garlic, tarragon, Swiss chard, and delicata squash

. . . → Read More: At the Garden: Saturday, August 22

At the Garden: Saturday, July 18

Today’s volunteers were from: Redeemer, Pilgrim, Hancock and First Baptist The weather turned out OK after all. With rain up until 7:30am, we had wet feet, but that was all.

The harvest totaled 60 lbs, consisting of: arugula, basil, beans, bok choy, cilantro, dill, kale, leeks, lettuce, mint, oriental peas, parsley, peppers, raspberries, radishes, . . . → Read More: At the Garden: Saturday, July 18

At the Garden: Saturday, July 11

Volunteers today from: First Parish, Chinese Bible Church of Greater Boston, Lexington Methodist, and the Lexington Catholic Community

Weather: lovely July morning– Sunny and 70 degrees.

The crew this morning had a lot to do since the Interfaith Garden was closed last Saturday for the 4th of July holiday. As you would expect, there was . . . → Read More: At the Garden: Saturday, July 11